A Good Night’s Sleep? The Truth about Using Marijuana and Alcohol as Sleep Aids

One in three people are said to suffer from occasional insomnia, and anyone who has experienced a more serious form of this sleep Alcohol will know just how frustrating and debilitating it can be. While some insomniacs turn to sleeping pills to assure them of a good night’s sleep, in the long run this is neither effective nor advisable, medically speaking.

But how successful are these drugs in inducing a good night’s sleep — and what are the drawbacks, over time, to using them as sleep aids?

A Nightcap or Three

“I honestly feel rested the next morning. Perhaps the second half of my sleep isn’t as restful as it could be, but it certainly beats the alternative — a sleepless night, tossing and turning and becoming more and more frustrated. Or, turning to sleeping pills, where the long-term effects still aren’t known, and experiencing adverse side-effects. I know it’s not exactly healthy to drink every night, but it’s not like I’m drinking excessively each night; it’s just a few drinks. I’m prepared to pay that price for a good night’s sleep.”

A Deficiency of Dreams

“I first started smoking marijuana when I was at college,” Leah says. “I’d found it difficult to fall asleep since I was a child, but the older I got, the more elusive sleep became. I first tried pot as a college student experimenting, and found that it was the only thing that sent me to sleep. My doctor had given me some pretty heavy-duty sleeping pills, but they didn’t work too well. I had a friend who became addicted to sleeping pills with some really bad consequences, so I was very wary of taking them as it was.”

Science’s Greatest Unsolved Mystery

“I suffered from chronic insomnia way before I started smoking pot. I do wish I didn’t have to rely on it though, because while it means I can guarantee a long, deep sleep, it does affect me negatively in some ways. I’m usually quite groggy in the mornings —Alcohol although, far less groggy than I would be if I hadn’t slept at all! But I have started to notice the effect on my memory, which is quite alarming considering that I’m not even 30 yet. But realistically, what else can I do if I want to sleep and refuse heavy medication? There’s no cure for insomnia; I can’t afford to go to a sleep clinic and even if I could, I don’t have the time for it.”

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